Shoulder

Anatomy of the Shoulder

The shoulder joint is the most mobile joint given its “ball-and-socket” structure. The humerus (upper arm bone) acts as the ball and the scapula (shoulder blade) as the socket.

Another important component of the shoulder joint’s mobility derives from the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff provides support to the shoulder’s many tendons and muscles bordering the joint. The rotator cuff’s tendons are protected by the bursa, a small bag of fluid-like solution acting as a cushion.

The Importance of the Shoulder

When tendons in the shoulder become inflamed or tear, they cause pain. The pain may occur with a variety of arm movement and rotation and may be temporary or chronic.

Treatment of Shoulder Problems

Our board certified orthopaedic surgeons specialize in the treatment, surgical and nonsurgical, of a variety of shoulder conditions and procedures including:

  • Shoulder Impingement

  • Rotator Cuff Injuries

  • Bursitis

  • Tendonitis

  • Arthritis

  • Dislocated Shoulder

  • Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior Tear

  • Frozen Shoulder

Johnathan Perry - Tri-City Orthopaedics

Johnathan R. Perry, MD, is double board certified in Orthopaedic Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. He specializes in the treatment, surgical and nonsurgical, of a variety of orthopaedic conditions and procedures.

Judd Fitzgerald - Tri-City Orthopaedics

Judd R. Fitzgerald, MD, is fellowship trained in orthopaedic sports medicine and shoulder surgery from Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He specializes in the treatment, surgical and nonsurgical, of a variety of orthopaedic conditions.

Mark Merrell, MD - Tri-City Orthopaedics

Mark R. Merrell, MD, is board certified in Orthopaedic Surgery and is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. He specializes in the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of most orthopaedic disorders and injuries.

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